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ELTR 1156  Residential Wiring I

Credits: 6.00 Credits

This lecture course introduces a student to the theories, principles, and laws of static and dynamic electricity. Direct and alternating current circuits are studied utilizing the related trade mathematics covering topics such as Ohm's law, resistance, power, inductance, and capacitance. Major emphasis is placed on applying trade related mathematics and analytical reasoning to troubleshooting series, parallel and compound circuits. National Electrical Code requirements and proper techniques for soldering/terminating conductors are covered. Students will learn to interpret and draw electrical schematics and wiring diagrams relating to low voltage signal circuits. The National Electrical Code and its application to residential branch circuit requirements and non-metallic wiring methods as well as correct electrical and component terminology is introduced.

ELTR 1166  Residential Wiring Lab IA

Credits: 6.00 Credits

Students will apply techniques learned in theory required to make proper terminations and soldered splices. Alternating and direct current circuits are constructed and students will analyze and confirm electrical principles and applicable laws. Emphasis is placed on safety, craftsmanship, correct, and accurate laboratory test procedures using appropriate test equipment such as Volt- Ohm-Milliampere Meters (VOM). Schematic drawings are required for each circuit and outside of lab, report and analysis writing is necessary.

ELTR 1176  Residential Wiring Lab IB

Credits: 6.00 Credits

Students receive hands-on training in the fundamentals of low and line voltage circuit construction. An emphasis is placed on safety, craftsmanship, NEC requirements, circuit planning, and circuit layout using the appropriate cable wiring methods. The correct selection and terminology of electrical components used for assigned circuits is required. Students will also demonstrate proper troubleshooting methodology and usage of test equipment required to find faults and repair electrical circuits. Time will be spent working on actual job sites. Schematic and wiring diagrams are required for each circuit and outside of lab, report and analysis writing is necessary.

ELTR 2156  Residential Wiring II

Credits: 6.00 Credits

Understanding and interpretation of the National Electrical Code requirements for residential branch circuits are covered in detail. Practical considerations for the economic and adequate distribution of electrical energy are discussed, as well as the adequacy of circuit design. Reading and interpreting floor plan drawings as they relate to all trades is taught. Power calculations along with all N.E.C. and utility company requirements for the installation of any type of residential service are covered. Conduit wiring methods are covered as well as all related National Electrical Code requirements. Substantial time is spent performing the mathematical calculations utilized for designing, laying out and bending conduit. Students are required to perform all tasks in a neat craftsman-like manner. Emphasis is placed on the reasonings of why workmanship is important.

ELTR 2166  Residential Wiring Lab IIA

Credits: 6.00 Credits

Substantial time is spent with students working the wiring systems on actual residential homes built off campus. In lab students design, layout, and manufacture every type of bend utilized with conduit raceway systems. Conduit fill calculations are applied as well as utilizing correct methods for installing branch circuit conductors. Students are required to apply the National Electrical Code to all work done in labs and on the outside projects. Major emphasis is placed on safety, craftsmanship, circuit analysis, and troubleshooting of circuit faults. Schematic and wiring diagrams are required for each circuit and outside of lab, report and analysis writing is necessary.

ELTR 2176  Residential Wiring Lab II B

Credits: 6.00 Credits

The lab emphasizes the application of the complete wiring system used for residential applications. Students will be required to complete several types of services, such as riser, mast, conduit and cable installations. Students will complete their freshman capstone project, which requires each student to redraw a two story residential home to scale. They will then perform the design work and layout all of the wiring required by the National Electrical Code and ensuring that it will meet the minimum adequacy requirements of a prospective homeowner. Students will then complete a spreadsheet containing all the components with their complete descriptions that are necessary to complete the Capstone project. Schematic and wiring diagrams are required for each circuit and outside of lab, report and analysis writing is necessary.

ELTR 3156  Electrical Power Systems

Credits: 6.00 Credits

This course will provide instruction in the applied mathematics, circuit analysis, design, installation, distribution methods, protection, and trouble of single phase and three phase electrical power systems.

ELTR 3306  Alarms and Special Systems

Credits: 6.00 Credits

This course will provide instruction in the applied mathematics, operation, design methodology, installation requirements, and National Electrical Code requirements for alarms and special systems.

ELTR 3326  Magnetic Motor Controls

Credits: 6.00 Credits

This course is designed to teach foundational concepts of motors and motor control. Safe work practices and code compliment procedures will be reinforced. The student will be introduced to the basic circuits, devices and components used in their control; advanced circuits of alternating, sequencing, latching, and time delay operations of motor control will be presented. The lab will progressively lead the student to a basic understanding of individual control devices. The student will apply the basic knowledge and safety protocol towards integration into a totally automated system using magnetic and solid state controls. Throughout all projects, from basic to fully automated systems, the student will be taught troubleshooting techniques of industrial motor controls. Students will be evaluated to assess their troubleshooting skills and techniques within the lab practicums.

ELTR 3336  Photovltc & Wind Trbn Systm In

Credits: 6.00 Credits

The course will cover the fundamentals of photovoltaic and wind power generation, installation and maintenance practices. The course content will include the components used in stand-alone systems, grid interconnect systems, and grid connected systems with battery back-up. Areas of focus will be: safe work practices and PPE, site evaluation, system sizing, zoning restrictions, funding resources, and installation practices in accordance with National Electrical Code, Building Code and NABCEP training objectives and requirements.

ELTR 3356  Prgrmble Cntrls for Ind Autotn

Credits: 6.00 Credits

This course presents the origin and evolution of programmable logic controllers. Special emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of Relay Ladder Logic (RRL) programming methods and the analysis of circuit operations as well as various applications of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC's) used in modern industrial applications. Students will receive the necessary hands-on experience in lab to be able to design, program, construct, troubleshoot, and perform preventive maintenance of all components of a PLC controlled process. Students will be evaluated on troubleshooting techniques, terminations of input and output devices, and the proper maintenance of at least two different types of PLC Manufactures.

ELTR 3366  Ind Automtn & Process Controls

Credits: 6.00 Credits

This course involves the study of effective process control theory. A systems approach is used in an effort to understand each instrument's function within the system. The course will also examine how pneumatics, hydraulics, Servo motors, and system automation are used in industry today for the manufacturing of products. This course also involves the practice of hands-on effective process control theory. A systems approach is used in an effort to understand each instrument's function within the system.