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MECH 1203  Materials Science

Credits: 3.00 Credits

This course is a first semester, freshman level course. It is a broad introductory study of the basic characteristics of engineering materials. The course will emphasize the selection of metals, plastics, ceramics, and composites for mechanical design purposes. The relationships of structure, material properties, and material selection to the design/ manufacturing process will be emphasized. The study will be enhanced by laboratory experience where the student will study mechanical testing equipment as well as chemical, mechanical and heat treatment effects on important material properties. The course will include the study of such areas as corrosion, strength, rigidity, wear resistance, thermal expansion, elasticity and plasticity principles of the common engineering materials. The course includes the use of equipment such as mechanical testing, light microscopes, electron microscopes, metallograph, furnaces and controllers. Data interpretation is also an important emphasis. The students also have substantial preparation work for the weekly labs.

MECH 1603  Graphics/CAD

Credits: 3.00 Credits

Graphics/CAD involves the visualization, sketching, and geometric construction of mechanical components. Students will layout and create 2D working industrial drawings that adhere to industry standards. This course will illustrate CAD drawing construction techniques that implement graphical communication through the use of the alphabet of lines, orthographic projection, section views, auxiliary views and the creation of assembly and detail mechanical components. This course will also use the ASME Standard Y14.5M-1994 for Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing to facilitate the communication of geometry requirements for associated features on detail components and assemblies.

MECH 1663  Manufacturing Processes

Credits: 3.00 Credits

The basic equipment, processes and services required to produce a product are studied. This course is designed to give the student the knowledge and vocabulary to generally comprehend the complex and inter-related design and manufacturing functions that must be accomplished to produce the end product. The processes covered include the making of iron and steel, casting, plastics production, hot and cold forming, machining, fastening, non-traditional machining, grinding, etc. Equipment covered in the lab include: lathes, grinders, milling machines, band saws, drill presses, precision measurement devices etc. As time or student experience permit, the topic of basic C.N.C. machine operations and programs may be introduced. Safety and proper manufacturing procedures will be emphasized.

MECH 2543  Advanced CAD Applications

Credits: 3.00 Credits

Advanced CAD is a continuation of the basic drafting standards and techniques facilitated through the course pre-requisite, MECH 1603. Delving into other mechanical drafting disciplines, this course will help students develop additional skill sets required in a variety of other mechanical fields. This course will cover, but not be limited to, machine design, weldments, structural steel, process piping, and pressure vessels. The major emphasis of this course will be the creation of working industrial drawings for fabrication and or successful integration into a mechanical assembly. The following standards will be used: ASME Sec. VIII, Div. 2, Pressure Vessel Code, ASME Y14.5M-Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing, ASME B31: Standards of Pressure Piping, ANSI B4.1: Limits and Fits, AISC: Standard Structural Steel Construction.

MECH 3124  HVAC Systems

Credits: 4.00 Credits

This course introduces the student to the fundamental principles of heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. Topics include psychometric principles and processes, equipment selection, heating and cooling load calculations and heating system principles including forced warm air, hot water, electric and steam systems and geothermal heating and cooling systems.

MECH 3203  Computer Aided Manufacturing

Credits: 3.00 Credits

This course is a study of Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) using software, programming languages and methods to produce Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining programs. CAD software is used to develop detailed drawings of student projects. Laboratory exercises include programming, machine tool setup and machine operation. Communication between the student laptops and the machine tools using current communication protocol is also studied.

MECH 3223  Mechanical Design Principles

Credits: 3.00 Credits

This course will emphasize the application of mechanical design for industrial machinery. The lecture material for this course will be enhanced through a laboratory experience using design techniques that include the creation of working industrial drawings, parametrically driven spreadsheet solutions of design problems, and component sizing and dimension determinations. The course will include the study of mechanical power systems such as gear trains, belt and chain drives, linkages, clutch-coupling brake components, torque transmission devices, shaft and component design calculations. The techniques of component design will also include the extensive use of online database information, standards and manufacturers specifications. At all times in this class, the design and development for manufacturability will be paramount.

MECH 3334  Statics

Credits: 4.00 Credits

This course is a study of introductory mechanics through the application of the principles of statics. Students will focus on the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Additional topics will include centroids, centers of gravity, and analysis of structures, friction, area and mass moments of inertia. The course will also emphasize the importance of problem-solving in statics by using algebraic and trigonometric computations.

MECH 3643  Manufacturing Management

Credits: 3.00 Credits

This course supplements the study of manufacturing processes with emphasis on techniques, processes and factors that contribute to manufacturing management decision making. Previous manufacturing process exposure is desirable but not essential. Selected topics to be discussed include: motion and time study, engineering economics, project planning and scheduling, Computer Integrated Manufacturing/Management (CIM), Just in Time manufacturing strategy, design for manufacturability, Statistical Process Control (SPC), Statistical Quality Control (SQC), and other management policies and strategies.

MECH 4003  Solid Modeling

Credits: 3.00 Credits

This course is an introduction to 3D solid modeling techniques utilizing feature-based, constraint-based parametric design. This course encourages the student to visualize parts in the 3D world and have a "design intent" plan for each part in which they will design. This will help in the arrangement of assemblies, parts, features, and dimensions to meet design requirements.

MECH 4024  Dynamics

Credits: 4.00 Credits

The course will emphasize applications of material involving the two basic concepts of dynamics, i.e., kinematics and kinetics and will introduce the students to vibrations. The course will include the study of levers, links, slide mechanisms, scotch yoke and the principles of force, torque, velocity, acceleration, inertia and friction. The course will use the principals of Equilibrium, Work-Energy and Impulse-Momentum along with Newton's Second Law to examine a variety of problems.

MECH 4224  Mechanical Systems Design

Credits: 4.00 Credits

This course will emphasize the application of mechanical design for industrial machinery. The lecture material for this course will be enhanced through a laboratory experience using design techniques that include the creation of working industrial drawings, parametrically driven spreadsheet solutions of design problems, and component sizing and dimension determinations. This course will include the study of linear motion devices, fluid power, rigid coupling design and flywheels. Also covered in this class is spring design and selection, bolted and welded joint design, column support and lifting lug design. The techniques of component design will also include extensive use of online database information, standards and manufacturers' specifications, and manufacturing for assembly. At all times in this class, the design and development for manufacturability will be paramount.

MECH 4333  CAM II

Credits: 3.00 Credits

Advanced CAM is a follow-up course to MECH 3204 and MECH 3203 CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing) and MECH 4003 (Solid Modeling). The course will introduce advanced Computer Aided Manufacturing topics such as APT (Automatically Programmed Tools) programming, additional CNC machine programming, solid modeling and Reverse Engineering Projects using a Coordinate Measurement Machine/System (CMM).

MECH 4523  Control System Fundamentals

Credits: 3.00 Credits

This course introduces students to the electronic components commonly used to monitor and control mechanical systems. Topics include principles of measurement, instrumentation, data acquisition, and control systems with an emphasis on mechanical engineering technology applications. Students build simulated control systems using switches and both traditional and solid state relays common on modern industrial machines. Safety interlock systems, delay circuits, and motor circuits are designed and wired. Lab projects allow students to experience a variety of design solutions and trouble-shoot electronic control systems.

MECH 4900  Directed Study

Credits: 1.00 TO 5.00 Credits

A student may contract for one to five credit hours of independent study through an arrangement with an instructor who agrees to direct such a study. The student will submit a plan acceptable to the instructor and to the department chairperson. The instructor and student will confer regularly regarding the process of the study.

MECH 5334  Mechanics of Materials

Credits: 4.00 Credits

This course is a calculus-based study of advanced concepts in Mechanics of Materials. It addresses the behavior of deformable mechanical components when subjected to tension, compression, torsion, flexure/bending or a combination of these loads. Extensive use is made of free body diagrams as well as Mohr's Circle for stress and strain. Experience is gained in the analysis of beam deflection, shafts in torsion, power, column buckling and thin walled pressure vessels. Analysis includes examination of stress concentrations, elastic and inelastic response, residual stresses, indeterminate structures and thermal effects. Superposition, singularity functions and theories of failure are studied. Laboratory experiences include traditional mechanical material testing and computer software applications.

MECH 5900  Directed Study

Credits: 1.00 TO 5.00 Credits

A student may contract for one to five credit hours of independent study through an arrangement with an instructor who agrees to direct such a study. The student will submit a plan acceptable to the instructor and to the department chairperson. The instructor and student will confer regularly regarding the process of the study.

MECH 6334  Fluid Mechanics

Credits: 4.00 Credits

This course is an introduction to the theory and application of continuum fluid mechanics. Fluid properties and state relations are studied. Incompressible laminar and turbulent flows are investigated using control volume, Reynolds Transport Theorem, and momentum and energy equations. Navier-Stokes Equations are developed. Dimensional analysis, Buckingham Pi Theorem and modeling are covered. Flow rate, pipe sizing and minor losses in pipe systems are addressed. Compressible flow and gas dynamics are introduced and include topics in boundary layer theory, mach number, stagnation properties and shock waves. Turbomachinery, pumps and turbines are included. Weekly laboratory experiences address most of the above topics.

MECH 7114  Applied Thermodynamics

Credits: 4.00 Credits

This course covers the basic concepts of thermodynamics including property evaluation of ideal gases and compressible substances. Theory and application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics relating to pumps, compressors, turbines, heat exchangers; power cycles-Carnot, Rankine; refrigeration cycles-vapor compression, heat pump are covered. Problem-solving skills are applied to ideal as well as actual cycles. Basic principles of energy conversion, energy conservation, efficiencies and environmental impacts are explored.

MECH 7153  Fluid Power Systems Design

Credits: 3.00 Credits

This is an upper level design course for all aspects of fluid power systems. Both hydraulic and pneumatic systems are covered. Topics covered in this class include pneumatic circuits, hydraulic power systems, hydrostatic transmissions, and electro-hydraulic control systems. Emphasis will be placed on system design and hydraulic and pneumatic component specification. The course prepares students to sit for the Hydraulic Specialist industry certification exam hosted by the National Fluid Power Society.

MECH 7223  Energy Systems

Credits: 3.00 Credits

This course evaluates the concepts of energy and identifies how it relates to current and future technology. Topics include the data analysis of various types of energy systems, conversion among the several forms of energy, environmental impacts, and cost analyses. Lecture is supported by laboratory activities that may include: experiments, data collection and analysis, field trips to energy production facilities, design activities, and a final group project emphasizing principles discussed and experienced throughout the lecture and laboratory portions of the course.

MECH 7603  Heat Transfer

Credits: 3.00 Credits

This course is a study of the physical effects of heat transfer phenomena including conduction, convection, and radiation. This will include the concepts of control volume analysis; conversion laws of mass, momentum and energy; steady state and transient conduction; laminar and turbulent convection; and phase change. A wide range of engineering problems will be presented to the students for solution using algebraic, differential and/or finite difference methods. The heat transfer process will be directly applied in the design and analysis of thermal energy systems.